By Lauren Simmons//The AS Review

Last week, Election Day in Washington brought tight races and happy drinkers.


Initiative 1183, which takes the state out of the liquor business, passed with 60 percent of the votes. Only stores over 10,000 suare feet will be eligible to sell liquor.


The availability of liquor in the state may go up dramatically, said Remy Levin, AS elections coordinator.  The increased availability of liquor was the major issue among individuals opposing I-1183.


“The campaign against the initiative made the point that liquor will be more available to minors, but whether or not that’s true, we’ll just have to wait and see,” Levin said. “It seems logical that the more places you can buy liquor, the more likely people will be able to buy it illegally, but no one really knows.”


Initiative 1183 will not take effect until June 2012.


Initiative 1125 dealt with tolls and the I-90 floating Bridge, and was defeated in a 51 percent victory.  The initiative would have made it possible for the state government to use toll fees for non-transportation related projects.


The election for Mayor of Bellingham has yet to be determined at the time of print. According to the Bellingham Herald, as of Nov. 10, Kelli Linville was leading Mayor Dan Pike by 406 votes out of the 19,332 cast.

 

By Grace Moore//The AS Review

 

In a Student Senate meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 9, a resolution concerning student publications was voted down.


The proposed resolution would have granted students and alumni the right to remove or alter online content in Western publications.


Student Senate Chair Kendall Bull proposed the resolution after learning the concerns of an anonymous students who was quoted in a campus publication.


The resolution stated that students or alumni could remove or alter the content of campus publications “in cases where damage to professional reputation can be shown,” according to the resolution.


The senate heard three speeches against student publication censorship before casting their votes. The final count was all opposed, with two abstentions by senators Felipe Espinoza and Jaime Hamilton.